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ARBORETUM NEWSLETTER
Yellowstone

"November Wellness Report"

Forest Bathing and a Look Ahead

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NOVEMBER 2019
" Previews of Coming Attractions "

As we end another successful season we look forward to what 2020 will offer. New introductions to the arboretum inventory and nurturing the recent additions will be top priority. We will be updating tree signage with the Montana native specimens and introducing the community Heritage Tree program. We will be conducting a soil Ph survey in all areas of the arboretum and continue with the Microclimate Study. Expansion of the "Dell" nature trail with color and texture will give that secluded spot a special location for "Forest Bathing" which is explained in more detail below. I hope you will join us in the discovering and re-discovering of trees in the arboretum.

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" M.U.C.F.A. Grant "

 

We are happy to announce that the Yellowstone Arboretum is a recipient of a Montana Urban Community Forestry Association grant. The grant will be used for the expansion of the Asian Garden. This tree diversification project includes the introduction of new species that you can see above. Some of these specimens were introduced up to 20 years ago in different areas of the grounds but failed for unknown reasons. Next spring they will be planted within the confines of the expanding Asian Garden and will offer an educational look for visitors as they watch their seasonal changes and growth. From left to right:

Japanese Zelkova, Venus Dogwood Tree, Golden Rain Tree, Katsura, Tulip Tree. Click each for expanded view.

" Unexpected Color...After the Freeze "

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In case you missed it we had some surprises after an early October snowstorm and freeze. The ability of trees to survive and prosper in the worst of conditions always amazes us. Leaves still in place and color abounds which can be contributed to the protection some of these trees get from their neighbors. From left to right:

Saskatoon Serviceberry-Sensory Garden, Maple and Swamp Oak-Plaza, Prairie Gem Pear-Plaza, Water Birch-Waterways.

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" Shinrin-yoku or Forest Bathing"

Forest bathing, forest therapy, or Shinrin-yoku, was developed in Japan in the 1980s.
There is a large amount of scientific evidence surrounding the health benefits of spending time in nature. Because of this, forest bathing became an integral part of preventive health care and healing in Japanese medicine.
The idea is that when humans spend time in a natural setting, especially under the canopy of a forest, they experience rejuvenating benefits to the mind, body and spirit.
This is not a novel concept. Traditionally people sought the restorative benefits of the forest as part of their everyday life.
However, with the increase of industry and modern civilization, we moved away from the forest and into the hustle and bustle of the city. We lost touch with nature.

It is well known that spending time in nature is good for your health, but what kind of benefits do we actually see?
People who spend time in the forest experience decreased cortisol (stress hormone) levels, which can help relieve high blood pressure, heart conditions, skin conditions, and asthma.
High stress levels can compromise your immune system. By reducing these levels your body’s natural defense system is able to work its magic. Trees release oils into the air, called phytoncides, and inhaling these natural essences can actually help to boost your immune system.

It’s simple! To start, find a forest or arboretum near you. It could be a forested area in your neighbourhood, a local conservation area, or simply a park.
Follow a trail into the forest. Once you are completely surrounded by nature stop, close your eyes, and engage your senses. Notice the smell of the earth, the sound of the birds, and the air moving across your skin.
If navigating your way through a forest bathing experience on your own seems a little overwhelming, there are many organizations that offer guided experiences.

< CLICK THE VIDEO ON THE LEFT FOR A SHORT PRESENTATION

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"TREE of the MONTH"

Quercus muehlenbergii, the chinkapin oak

 

An oak in the white oak group. The species was often called Quercus acuminata in older literature. 

Scientific name: Quercus muehlenbergii
Rank: Species
Higher classification: Oak
Family: Fagaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Did you know: The chinquapin oak is especially known for its sweet and palatable acorns. 

Our "tree of the month" hasn't even been planted yet but we are looking forward to it's arrival next spring. It will be a great addition to the collection. You will be able to find it in the South Plaza.

OUR MISSION STATEMENT

"The mission of the Yellowstone Arboretum is to cultivate arboreta appreciation and understanding of our local heritage through public education, organic preservation and stewardship of our natural environment."

Upcoming Events

VOLUNTEERS

 CLIMATOLOGICAL REPORT

BOTANICAL SOCIETY of ZOOMONTANA

 

No meeting for November

Emerald Ash Borer presentation

 Billings Library

Monday November 4

6 to 8 p.m.

Presented by the City of Billings

   

VOLUNTEER WORK

Special thanks to the following volunteer groups who planted trees and "spruced" up the pathways.

Wells Fargo

MSUB Students

Church of Christ Youth Group

Tumbleweed Youth Group

CLICK TO ENLARGE

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"NEW PLANTING"

Arboretum staff and the Wells Fargo volunteers introduced 5 new species to the grounds in October. The Bosnian Pine Grove, a Frontier Elm, Accolade Elm and Yellowwood were planted near Wolf Junction and a "Mountain Frost" Pear tree was planted in Orchard Lane. The Elms are Dutch Elm resistant and the Pear has been cultivated for our Montana climate. The pines were a donation from Good Earth Works and the other tees were purchased from the Northern Rockies Tree School diversification sale. A mature Cladrastis kentukea, Yellowwood, is pictured below.

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"WEB OFFERINGS"

We have created a new webpage to show the Montana native trees and shrubs located throughout the arboretum including the recently discovered "Antelope Bitter Brush" pictured below.

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE

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Quarter three has been archived as we start the the last of 2019. You can follow the progress of the monthly reports by clicking on the information below:

SOUTH PLAZA

WATERWAYS

ASIAN GARDEN

OLD POND

DOTTIE'S GARDEN

HOMESTEAD COLLECTION

SENSORY GARDEN