ARBORETUM NEWSLETTER

Summer Edition

Yellowstone Arboretum

QUARTERLY NEWSLETTER
"SHADES of SUMMER"

Summer has arrived sooner than we expected with heat and dry conditions. Nevertheless, the trees carry on with some summer surprises. The Japanese Lilac and Peking Lilacs will be in bloom early summer with creamy white panicles and a sweet aroma. Early summer is also a bloom time for the Mackii Amurensis and late summer for the Chinese Lacebark Elm. It keeps the pollinators busy !

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"MEMORIAL TREE PROGRAM"

The purchase of a tree or bench is a great way of remembering a loved one. The arboretum has received many requests so far this year for new trees to be planted on the grounds. Bear Meadows is a perfect location for conifers and anywhere along the pathway network is ideal for a new bench. A favorite tree or color is the best way to honor your loved as a lasting tribute.

Editor's Note: Contact Jessica at the Zoo for more information

" SUMMER TIME SECRETS "
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New leaves of the Maacki Amurensis

" White on White "

With summer comes a rather quiet color time for trees in the arboretum. Nevertheless, there are some interesting trees to look for. June marks the bloom time for Japanese and Peking Lilacs with their creamy white panicles. The Bristly Locust and Purple Robe Locusts bloom in June as well. Late June and early July marks the bloom time for any mature Amur Mackii. Two new trees of this species have been planted in the south Plaza and Asian Garden.

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Peking Lilac

          "ANOTHER LATE BLOOMER"

 

Curator's Note

The arboretum's collection consists of two specimens located the the Waterways Area. What's unusual about this tree is the bloom time which occurs in late August and early September. Tiny reddish pink flowers appear (see picture above) on the end of branches. You can expect the bees to be busy during this period.

Culture

Grow in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. Tolerant of light shade. Prefers rich, moist loams. Adapts to a variety of different soils and tolerates both wet and dry sites. Generally tolerant of urban conditions.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Ulmus parvifolia, commonly called Chinese elm or lacebark elm, is a medium-sized deciduous tree that typically grows to 40-50’ (less frequently to 70’) tall with a rounded crown and long pendulous branching. It is native to China, Korea and Japan. It is noted for its excellent foliage, multi-colored bark, rapid growth and good resistance to Dutch elm disease. Insignificant, small, reddish-green flowers appear in late summer. Flowers give way to single-seeded wafer-like samaras (each tiny seed is surrounded by a flattened circular papery wing) that mature in fall. Elliptic to ovate, shiny dark green leaves (to 3” long) have small teeth. Leaves typically turn an undistinguished dull yellow in fall, but sometimes produce more interesting yellows or reddish-purples. One of the most ornamental features of this tree is its mottled bark. On mature trees, bark flakes to reveal patches of gray, cream, orange, brown and green.

 

Chinese elm has good resistance to Dutch elm disease, a fatal fungal disease spread by airborne bark beetles. It also has good resistance to Japanese beetle and elm leaf beetle. Occasional disease problems include wilts, rots, cankers and leaf spots. Branches tend to break when stressed with snow, ice or wind. This species should not be confused with the much inferior Siberian elm, Ulmus pumila, which is often referred to as Chinese elm.

 

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Chinese Lacebark Elm

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"Arboretum Travel Escape"

One of the finest arboretums and botanical gardens in the country, the Missouri Botanical Gardens offers visitors a once-in-a-lifetime event. The arboretum, gardens, Butterfly House and Nature Reserve are just a small slice of what the MBG has to offer. So if St.Louis we highly recommend a day-long visit to enjoy nature at it's best.

 

Founded in 1859, the Missouri Botanical Garden is one of the oldest botanical institutions in the United States and a National Historic Landmark. It is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

 

The garden is a center for botanical research and science education of international repute, as well as an oasis in the city of St. Louis, with 79 acres of horticultural display. It includes a 14-acre Japanese strolling garden named Seiwa-en; the Climatron geodesic dome conservatory; a children's garden, including a pioneer village; a playground; a fountain area and a water locking system, somewhat similar to the locking system at the Panama Canal; an Osage camp; and Henry Shaw's original 1850 estate home. It is adjacent to Tower Grove Park, another of Shaw's legacies.

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CLICK FOR TOURS
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BUCKTHORN ERADICATION PROGRAM

Be sure to check out our website home page to access more information regarding the European Buckthorn Eradication Program commencing in June. Meet Hunter the force behind the program and his plans for making this a successful operation !

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OUR MISSION STATEMENT

"The mission of the Yellowstone Arboretum is to cultivate arboreta appreciation and understanding of our local heritage through public education, organic preservation and stewardship of our natural environment."

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COMINGS & GOINGS

Be sure to check out our Home Page for more information regarding the Pollinator Festival June 26th !

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WALKING AND TALKING

Our "Out on a Limb" tree tours continue this season along with Tree Talk on Saturdays at 12:30 in the amphitheater. We want to thank this Girl Scout Troop for their participation in learning about arboretums, learning how to prune trees and making a science of leaf identification !

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THE DELL IS OPEN

Be sure to check out "The Dell" a short nature trail located behind the Otter habitat. It's a cool and shady respite from our hot summer afternoons.

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MNLA FALL TOUR

The arboretum will be hosting a special tour of the grounds in September as part of the Montana Nursery & Landscape Association's Fall Tour. Nursery, landscape and tree people from around Montana will participate is viewing the trees. More information will be coming soon.

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INFORMATION KIOSK

July 9th marks the date for the installation of the arboretum's new informational kiosk. Special thanks to the Montana Urban & Community Forestry Association for their grant to make this important educational tool available for visitors.

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COLOR ON THE PATHWAYS

Be sure to check out this season's color along the pathways and at the animal exhibits. Special thanks to Nancy Welch for spear-heading this project again this year. Special thanks also to the private contributors who made this project special.

THANKS

A big shout out to the TRIO youth volunteer group for their great work in helping the arboretum plant trees, shrubs and bare roots. It was a great learning experience for all !

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